The Many Ways You Say “No” to a Raise

You might think you'd never refuse a pay raise, right? Yet you might be rejecting it before you even ask because...

...you're not asking. You're saying No to yourself before you have a chance for a Yes. Let's look at this further.

Rejection—getting a No from their boss—is what women tell me is one of their top fears in asking for a raise. So I teach them that a "No" is not the end of the conversation. 

Instead, it's the signal to employ a simple tactic to diffuse the objection, then pivot the conversation towards mutual agreement. You get all the how-to specifics and scripts inside both the Pay Raise Prep Crash Course and the Ready to Ask Master Class (premium course).

But before that happens, there are objections (rejection!) from yourself that need to be tackled.

What I’m about to tell you is a tough truth, yet I want you to hear my words delivered gently. My goal for you is awareness of the self-objections as a step toward positive change.

The Ways You Say "No" to a Raise

There many ways you say No to a pay raise before you even ask. They stem from your fear of asking and sound like this:

  • “I’ve been working hard and performing well, so I’ll just wait until my manager offers me a raise.”
  • “I’m afraid my boss will think I’m greedy.”
  • “My manager doesn’t want to hear about what I want.”
  • “Forget it. I’m too nervous to ask for a raise. Besides, I can live on what I’m making and I like my work. Money isn’t everything.”

Have you had thoughts like these? If so, they're holding you back from boosting your salary.

How to Tackle Self-Objections

If you want to accelerate your salary, first take the brakes off the self-talk that slows you down. Here's how to tackle the objections that block you from asking for a raise:

  1. Write out all the self-talk that keeps you from asking for a raise.
  2. Then write an objective statement for each one which counters the misguided thought. For example:

Objection: “I’ve been working hard and performing well, so I’ll just wait until my manager offers me a raise.”

Counter the Objection: “Now I know better: waiting is an indirect approach that will not advance my salary and career. I need to be clear and direct with my request. I’ve methodically followed the Pay Raise Process, so now I have a solid plan and I’m ready to ask for a pay raise.”

Objection: “I’m afraid my manager will think I’m greedy.”

Counter the Objection: “My request has nothing to do with greed. It’s about being paid fairly for the work I do. I’ve researched the market value for my position and I have objective data that shows my pay package should be higher.” OR “My request has nothing to do with greed. The measurable value I’ve been bringing to the organization merits a salary increase.”

Now Your Turn...

Objection: “My manager doesn’t want to hear about what I want.”

Counter the Objection: ____________________________________________________________

Objection: “Forget it. I’m too nervous to ask for a raise. Besides, money isn’t everything. I like my work and I can live on what I’m making.”

Counter the Objection: ____________________________________________________________

Need help? Find the Counter the Objection replies inside both the Crash Course and the Ready to Ask Master Class. Enroll in the one that best meets your needs now.

To make pay raise progress, don't reject your raise before you even ask for it. Take the steps to overcome objections from both your manager and yourself.